pay rent – Now Wash Your Hands http://nowwashyourhands.com/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 16:59:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nowwashyourhands.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4.png pay rent – Now Wash Your Hands http://nowwashyourhands.com/ 32 32 Eviction cases overwhelm legal aid 6 weeks after moratorium https://nowwashyourhands.com/eviction-cases-overwhelm-legal-aid-6-weeks-after-moratorium/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://nowwashyourhands.com/eviction-cases-overwhelm-legal-aid-6-weeks-after-moratorium/ Anna Aboody of Mobilization for Justice and Diana Ayala, Council Member (LinkedIn, Council for NYC) A city council committee hearing held to assess the status of evictions since the moratorium ended six weeks ago found an influx of filings threatened to overwhelm legal aid providers. Anna Aboody, a nonprofit attorney for Mobilization for Justice in […]]]>

Anna Aboody of Mobilization for Justice and Diana Ayala, Council Member (LinkedIn, Council for NYC)

A city council committee hearing held to assess the status of evictions since the moratorium ended six weeks ago found an influx of filings threatened to overwhelm legal aid providers.

Anna Aboody, a nonprofit attorney for Mobilization for Justice in the Bronx, compared the flood of cases to the dozens of Covid patients entering understaffed hospitals at the height of the pandemic.

“Unlike the overburdened emergency and intensive care units which had no control over the number of people requiring care, the Office of Court Management does not and should not continue as if it had no other choice than to schedule as many new cases as possible,” Aboody mentioned.

The courts have turned to planning cases for tenants who have yet to find a lawyer, which the lawyer called a “misplaced emergency”, rather than prioritizing those in which the two parties have a lawyer.

State data judicial system show that around 18,000 cases have been filed since the start of the year, well below the more than 43,000 filed in the first two months of 2020, before the moratorium began.

However, Jesenia Ponce, chief attorney at the Northern Manhattan Improvement Corporation, said the new filings add to a backlog of more than 200,000 cases that have remained unresolved throughout the pandemic.

Lawyers and attorneys have argued that moving cases forward when the tenant hasn’t found an attorney undermines the effectiveness of Right to Counsel, a program the city expanded last year to ensure legal representation. free to all low-income tenants.

“We want to be clear that we expect the court to adjourn every case until a tenant has been connected with a lawyer,” said N’Jelle Murphy, Chief Tenants of the Flatbush Tenant Coalition.

Another problem: Local law 53, which requires the city to work with advocacy groups to educate tenants about their access to the right to an attorney. The legislation, signed by then-mayor Bill de Blasio last May, has yet to be “fully implemented,” according to attorneys and tenant attorneys.

Laura Springer, a tenant leader with Catholic Migration Services, said the city has allocated $3.6 million for the outreach act, money community organizations have yet to see.

Council member Diana Ayala, who chairs the general welfare committee, said she was unaware the law had not been enforced.

Other attorneys have criticized the accessibility of city-funded rent relief and housing vouchers, testifying that bureaucracy puts more tenants at risk of court-ordered eviction.

Although tenants can still apply for the Emergency Housing Assistance Program to get up to a year of eviction protection, ERAP is strapped for money and new funds have yet to be secured.

As a stopgap solution, the nonprofits are advising tenants to apply for One Shot Deal, a city program that offers temporary loans to people facing eviction. But these advocates argue that the rules of the program prevent many tenants from getting help.

Marika Dias, an attorney at the Urban Justice Center, said the city should reduce the requirement that tenants must prove their ability to pay rent later and increase available financing. The program typically distributes around $150 million per year; in comparison, ERAP has exhausted its $2 billion in funding and needs an additional $2 billion to meet pending requests.

Although the city and state expanded their housing voucher programs last year to federal Section 8 levels, advocates said strict requirements and processing delays have prevented qualified applicants from getting a housing through so-called CityFHEPS vouchers, which puts some of these tenants at risk of displacement.

Kathleen Keller, an attorney with the Legal Aid Society, called on the city to eliminate the rule that tenants must have lived in the housing system for three months or received an eviction notice to be eligible. She also said the city should make the program available to all rent-deprived New Yorkers who earn less than 200% of the federal poverty level “to really address the [eviction] crisis” and streamline the application process.

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There are far worse things than being a three-point receiver. https://nowwashyourhands.com/there-are-far-worse-things-than-being-a-three-point-receiver/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 03:02:58 +0000 https://nowwashyourhands.com/there-are-far-worse-things-than-being-a-three-point-receiver/ I admit it. I was also an envious post-teen, one of those academics who every time I saw their high school classmates get their first salaries, buy their first cars, and indulge in whims that wouldn’t be out of my reach until much later. , I wondered what I had done wrong. The worker at […]]]>

I admit it. I was also an envious post-teen, one of those academics who every time I saw their high school classmates get their first salaries, buy their first cars, and indulge in whims that wouldn’t be out of my reach until much later. , I wondered what I had done wrong. The worker at BMW, that stereotype of the time, was me enemy unspeakable. “You’ll see in a few years,” my mother would say, but she couldn’t see anything.

Until the years pass and I see it. There is no envy more stupid than that of the privileged, although he cannot see beyond his own navel, sheltered in the myth of meritocracy. But if I studied a lot, but if I had made an effort to get good grades and study what I wanted, but if I deserve it and they don’t. Those were the pre-Crisis years, when climbing scaffolding was truly believed to be a shortcut to abundance. But the friends of my high school friends were like that: adults, without studies but with a car, when I was a mindundi that I didn’t have no more bus card.

The tragedy of the college student is that he is where he does not belong

Through the years of crisis, I finally felt understood. Journalists started (we started) to publish profiles of young talents with three degrees, two masters and a course abroad who could not find work or were forced to accept “unskilled” jobs (pardon the ‘expression). We identified with them because it was actually us. The tragedy of these stories was not that they were unfairly paid jobs, but jobs that did not correspond to them, that were reserved for others. To the poor.

These articles have always attracted attention, because they touched a very sensitive point in the Spanish collective imagination. of the betrayal of expectations middle class. In some cases, the disappointment was financial: with the price that the masters cost us!

What appeared much less in the media were the workers who had remained in the streets, all those friends towards whom he felt a desire that turned into relief at not being in their place, perhaps because the Spanish bourgeoisie (i.e. all but the Kings) did not identify with them. As my teenage idiot thought, they hadn’t made it, they didn’t deserve it. the problem was his.

The myth of two thousand years. (EFE/Rolex Del Pena)

This week circulated on social networks the umpteenth installment of this series which told the story of a young 23-year-old biotechnology student who had to work as a storekeeper and considers that she will only be able to become independent at the age of 30. . The accounts keep coming out. The fine print of these kinds of stories that usually don’t have a sequel is that it’s possible that in a few years that person won’t be doing so badly, or at least, not as bad as others.

The author of the article titled “deceived generation” to that of the young woman, and I’m starting to think that the “cheated generation” must be the longest generation in history, because it’s mine, those born in the 80s, and the yours, that of people born in the late 1990s. The story of generational deception is already too long, perhaps because it is based on a misconception: that injustice does not lie in the fact that there are bad jobs, but in the fact that these bad jobs are not filled by the working class.

Academic Suspicion

Societies oscillate between illusions and disillusions, and today we distrust the university as much as our parents (and grandparents) trusted it, because value what you don’t have more than what you take for granted. The university has been for several generations the main gateway not only to social advancement, but above all to cultural, professional and social possibilities until recently reserved for a few. The main bet of millions of families, who saw with excitement how their children could go where they couldn’t.

Disappointment led us to a modification of the almost nihilistic totality

For this reason, the stereotype of the “three pass restocking” has become so deeply embedded in the Spanish imagination, as a symbol that something had gone wrong. The so-called meritocratic pact that paved the way for the post-Transition era, which ensured that the university guaranteed us a privileged place in society, had been broken. The logic was as follows: an immigrant or a person without studies, if they earn badly as storekeepers, they are in their place, the company functions perfectly. If this happens to a university student, the social order has been corrupted. It’s not about dignity, it’s about whether you belong or not.

Eyes were not turned towards the labor market, nor towards companies, what are they going to do if they can hire doctors at the price of the Smic, but towards the university. Why did you betray us? This disappointment has gradually led to an unwarranted mistrust, which is accompanied by an amendment of the totality until it almost falls into an immobilizing nihilism. It was well summed up recently in a TVE program by the sociologist and political scientist Joan Navarro: “Before the main inheritance that a father could give to his children was a university education, today university education has much less worth that your father can pay you the rent of a house”.

Suspicion before betrayal. (EFE / Fernando Villar)

Ato career it’s not worth anything” It’s a phrase we’ve grown tired of hearing, and I suppose it delights companies that have to sell master’s degrees at increasingly unaffordable prices, so much so that the middle and working classes take mortgages to simply aspire to get a job. Even setting aside the fact that the university should be much more than an employment agency that “guarantees” a job, it is lie. According to him SEPEthe number of long-term unemployed without studies is more than double that of university graduates (48.97% against 23.36%).

Let no one be fooled by the headlines that claim that the unemployment rate for vocational training graduates is lower than that for university students: this alone it’s among the young, among other things because they enter the labor market earlier. For now, as INE data shows (thanks to colleague Martha’s Law to find the data), university students suffer from long-term unemployment which represents nearly half that of FPs (3.1 against 6.2%).

Thinking that not everything matters benefits those who are already starting from privileged positions

There is something very dangerous in the ease with which we accept that the university is useless, how we lend ourselves to devaluing it by repeating subjects, by defending that it is not serious to do this or that thing because meritocracy doesn’t work and, therefore, there’s nothing what can we do It’s an elitist trap because it takes away from the majority of people the main tool they had to improve their conditions, no only economically, but also socially and culturally. I eat well He said Lucas Gortazar, “children of the lower classes are compensated to go to university, it is very clear. To say that studying is useless is fake and classic“.

This is the danger of completely mistrusting meritocracy through exceptional narratives. To think that not everything is of exactly the same importance only benefits those who are already starting from privileged positions, because it discourages others from looking for alternatives. For decades, children from the lower classes entered Spanish universities like never before, leading to the greatest educational and social improvement in the history of our country. Finally, those who didn’t have to be there because their place was another took up positions that were reserved for a few.

Opinion

I met a friend from Complu the other day. Maybe we complained together fifteen years ago that soon we could be nothing but low-paid hoarders, but ultimately we weren’t. He told me the same thing he had been seeing for a long time. That after all this time we university students had managed to open a breach for ourselves, but those of us who had not, they had trouble. The bourgeois myth of the sock boy with three careers disappointed by the university makes us forget the sad reality of the worker who spends decades chained to humiliations until one fine day he finds himself with nothing.

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Readers Write: Deportation, Ukraine, Mask Warrants, Cancellation of Twin Metals Lease https://nowwashyourhands.com/readers-write-deportation-ukraine-mask-warrants-cancellation-of-twin-metals-lease/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 23:46:09 +0000 https://nowwashyourhands.com/readers-write-deportation-ukraine-mask-warrants-cancellation-of-twin-metals-lease/ The story of tenants at 21 properties in Columbia Heights facing eviction due to their landlord’s unwillingness to make mandated repairs is a prime example of what happens to tenants when out-of-state companies are allowed to buying several single-family homes just for the purpose of profit (“Tenants said they have to leave”, January 25). These […]]]>

The story of tenants at 21 properties in Columbia Heights facing eviction due to their landlord’s unwillingness to make mandated repairs is a prime example of what happens to tenants when out-of-state companies are allowed to buying several single-family homes just for the purpose of profit (“Tenants said they have to leave”, January 25). These corporations, often owned by investment groups, have no stake in the communities where the homes they own are located, or in the families that occupy those homes.

What if cities, perhaps with state and federal assistance, had programs to purchase single-family homes (and even apartment buildings) whose owners have proven unable to meet the city ​​standards for quality housing, and worked with tenants to help them buy their homes? Could cities also provide assistance to bring houses up to standard and help residents who do not want to own their homes to move out and then sell the houses to other families? When large numbers of single-family homes are bought up cheaply by investors, as happened in many communities after the foreclosure crisis, the housing stock available to those who want to buy homes and maintain their ties to their family and community is greatly reduced. If cities allow their housing stock to be purchased by outside investors, neighborhood cohesion and quality of life are negatively affected, crime rates rise, and families who can afford it move elsewhere to buy homes and generate the emotional and financial security that home ownership can provide.

Rachel Fang, Falcon Heights

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If I can’t clear my sidewalk, the city sends me a letter saying, basically, “Plough or we will.” If I don’t erase it, they do and charge me.

Why can’t something like this be worked out for unresponsive owners?

Stephen A. Mayer, Minneapolis

•••

The law must change: if a rental permit is revoked, the tenant must be able to stay (unless the building is completely unsafe). The tenant would pay the rent into an escrow account, but the landlord would never get it. Finally, the lessor could not terminate or decide not to renew the lease. There should be significant costs for irresponsible owners.

Maybe the escrow rent could be used for enhanced inspections.

Bob Gordon, Minneapolis

UKRAINE

I would like to see NATO countries start negotiating with Ukraine to become a member now (“Strengthening NATO is a prudent decision”, editorial, January 26). Then we could say to Russian President Vladimir Putin: “Withdraw your forces from the Ukrainian border and we will stop the accession talks”. Putin says he wants Ukraine to stay out of NATO, and he could get what he wants. However, I have learned that when dealing with bullies, you have to take the initiative by challenging them on the issue. Let him earn what he wants instead of obediently asking us what we want.

David Rosene, Brooklyn Park

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In 1962, during the Cuban Missile Crisis, war was averted when the USSR withdrew the missiles from the island. At the time, we had nuclear missiles in Turkey targeting Soviet cities. These American missiles were in Turkey before 1962 and were close to Soviet territory. So why didn’t the Soviets threaten nuclear war? Maybe they were just trying to level the playing field. (I personally think they backed off in Cuba because the United States demonstrated in World War II that we were ready to use nuclear weapons from first strike, and the Soviets were not.)

This is the current situation in Ukraine. When the Soviet Union collapsed, the United States promised Russia that NATO would not expand eastward. [Opinion editor’s note: U.S. officials say this promise was never made.] The United States reneged on this promise and the former Soviet bloc countries joined NATO.

In 2014 Viktor Yanukovych’s regime was overthrown. He was friendly to Russia and indifferent to the West. Thus began Ukraine’s march towards NATO membership. And now Putin is surrounded by bellicose power and has dozens of missiles pointed at him at point-blank range with the real prospect of missiles right on his border, not to mention NATO military exercises just around the corner from Russian territory.

What would you do? I think it’s drawing a line in the sand just like the United States did in 1962, except it’s not threatening the world with a nuclear holocaust. You might think that after being defeated in Vietnam and embarrassed in Iraq and Afghanistan, that country’s war hawks would be somewhat subdued. But they don’t, blaming everything on Putin, insulting him like a bunch of irritable schoolchildren.

Why doesn’t Biden, ignoring the rabid hawks, simply guarantee that Ukraine will not be invited into NATO for 20 years, when everything can be reviewed? Give Putin a break; that’s all he asks.

Steven Boyer, St. Paul

ST. CLOUD MASK MANDATE

St. Cloud City Councilman Paul Brandmire voted against a three-week mask mandate for public buildings because he has “not yet seen a reliable study that proves masks have an impact whatever” (“St. Cloud Rejects 3-Week Mask Rule,” Jan. 26). I don’t know what he means by ‘reliable’, ‘proven’ or ‘no impact’, but I don’t think he does either. Anyone can go to Google Scholar and review numerous studies that show masks reduce airborne transmission of viral infections, which is how the majority of COVID cases are contracted. COVID-specific studies show that masking reduces transmission by around 60-70%.

I don’t think he will find a controlled study where scientists expose people to virus particles with half the subjects masked and the other half unmasked, because that would generally be considered unethical. But if that’s the only study he would consider reliable, I suspect he doesn’t want to know the answer.

David Brockway, Hopkins

The author is a retired physician.

TWIN METALS LEASES

As a resident of the Iron Range, I support the Biden administration’s decision to cancel Twin Metals’ mining leases on federal lands in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (“Twin Metals’ leases axed”, front page, January 27). There are rules that govern how these leases are to be treated, and the fact that those rules have been found to have been ignored alone justifies revocation. When you add that foreign owners of Twin Metals rented a mansion to Ivanka Trump in DC as soon as her father took office, well, it doesn’t take much imagination to see how those leases were magically granted in the first place. This, of course, before we get to the fact that the BWCA is a protected wilderness area and that a foreign corporation’s desire for wealth does not alter the law protecting this special place from pollution.

It’s no surprise that US Representative Pete Stauber, the man who refused to get up for the rule of law in relation to the attack on the Capitol, denounces the respect for the law in this case. Having repeatedly voted against the interests of children in the Eighth District, as his vote vs the March 2021 COVID relief package, I seriously doubt he cares one bit about child labor in foreign countries (which he mentions in his Press release on the decision). Rather than help a foreign company with its own questionable environmental and labor track record, he should consider dropping his opposition to legislation that would help children living in his district.

Kelly Dahl, Linden Grove Township, Minn.

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The Big Business of Bad Auto Loans | Subprime auto lenders https://nowwashyourhands.com/the-big-business-of-bad-auto-loans-subprime-auto-lenders/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 11:09:28 +0000 https://nowwashyourhands.com/the-big-business-of-bad-auto-loans-subprime-auto-lenders/ According to a Consumer Reports review of regulatory documents and legal documents, these methods sometimes start with lenders working with dealerships to mark up cars sold to low-income borrowers more than they do to customers with better credit, or to resell them in more expensive cars. they can’t afford. Lenders are also accused of structuring […]]]>

According to a Consumer Reports review of regulatory documents and legal documents, these methods sometimes start with lenders working with dealerships to mark up cars sold to low-income borrowers more than they do to customers with better credit, or to resell them in more expensive cars. they can’t afford. Lenders are also accused of structuring loans and their agreements with dealers in such a way as to guarantee a profit even if borrowers default, according to the attorneys general.

And when borrowers fall behind, as often happens, lenders work aggressively to collect debts through repossession and wage garnishment, according to allegations in documents reviewed by CR.

“There are lenders with a business model, it seems, that expects some level of repossession, maybe even wants some level of repossession,” says Pamela Foohey, a professor at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in New York, who has published several studies on car credit.

In the third quarter of 2021, Credit Acceptance and Santander reported net profits of $250 million and $763 million, respectively, in the prior three months.

In other words, it’s good business to write bad debts.

But it’s a perilous model for low-credit consumers. Exorbitant interest rates, with terms often spanning 72 months or more and monthly payments absorbing a significant portion of their income, make default likely.

And when that happens, lives can be turned upside down. When someone’s car is seized and their salary and tax refunds seized, a vicious cycle begins that makes it difficult for them to rebuild their credit, keep a job, or pay rent or other bills. .

Santander declined to comment on CR’s specific questions about the allegations, but said in a statement it was a “responsible lender” operating in a highly regulated environment.

“We treat our customers like individuals, striving to find sustainable financing solutions that work across a wide range of incomes and credit scores,” said company spokeswoman Laurie Kight. “If customers are in arrears, we seek to provide options to help them maintain their vehicle, including loan modifications and payment deferrals, as repossession is always a last resort.”

Credit Acceptance also declined to comment on specific questions about pending court cases, citing company policy.

“Credit Acceptance has been in business for nearly 50 years because we provide financing programs through auto dealerships nationwide that enable struggling, credit-blind consumers to purchase vehicles and build or rebuild their credit,” the company said in a statement to CR.

“We are pleased to have resolved the allegations brought by the Attorney General of Massachusetts and the Attorney General of Mississippi in 2021, and proudly continue to serve clients in these states through our funding programs.”

Josh Lauer, associate professor of communication at the University of New Hampshire, who has written extensively on the credit scoring industry, points out that the development of credit scores – something that plays an important role in loan underwriting automobiles – is a double-edged sword. Thanks to the credit score, more people can access loans, but for some, these loans can be a financial disaster.

“It helps unethical lenders identify the most vulnerable borrowers and then take advantage of them,” Lauer says. “Most lenders are presumably trying to make money, but doing so in an ethical way.”

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Applications are open for the state’s $ 539 million Homeowner Assistance Fund https://nowwashyourhands.com/applications-are-open-for-the-states-539-million-homeowner-assistance-fund/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 21:08:05 +0000 https://nowwashyourhands.com/applications-are-open-for-the-states-539-million-homeowner-assistance-fund/ [ad_1] New York homeowners facing financial hardship caused by the COVID-19 pandemic can now apply for up to $ 50,000 in relief to avoid foreclosure and pay for expenses like water bills and taxes land. On Monday, New York residents could start applying for the state’s Homeowner Assistance Fund, which is eligible for homeowners at […]]]>


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New York homeowners facing financial hardship caused by the COVID-19 pandemic can now apply for up to $ 50,000 in relief to avoid foreclosure and pay for expenses like water bills and taxes land.

On Monday, New York residents could start applying for the state’s Homeowner Assistance Fund, which is eligible for homeowners at risk of default, foreclosure or displacement.

The number of requests for money will likely exceed the number of requests that can be funded with the $ 539 million allocated to the program, the state app’s website warned. Requests will be processed in the order they are received, and submitting a request does not guarantee assistance for any particular person or family.

New York became the first state in the county to receive funding through a $ 10 billion federal homeowner assistance fund that was approved as part of the coronavirus stimulus package last spring.

RELATED: New York Homeowners Can Apply for Relief Funding to Pay Mortgage and Utility Bills.

State The Homeowners Assistance Fund is separate the Emergency Rent Assistance Program, which provided funds for the payment of rent and utilities to landlords on behalf of eligible tenants.

Still, the State Owners Assistance Fund is a balm, especially for historically disadvantaged communities, state officials said this week.

Governor Kathy Hochul said the State Homeowners Assistance Fund is an “essential tool to help alleviate the pain of the pandemic being disproportionately felt in rural communities, communities of color and communities. of immigrants “.

“My administration will continue to support homeowners, tenants and all New Yorkers every step of the way as we move forward in our economic recovery,” she added.

Learn more about homeowner assistance in New York:New York homeowners can apply for relief financing to pay off their mortgage and utility bills. here’s how

Who can apply?

New York Governor Kathy Hochul speaks about COVID prevention measures in New York City during a press conference at the Rochester Educational Opportunity Center at SUNY Brockport in Rochester on January 3, 2022.

The program is available to New York residents who also own and live in this home as their primary residence, according to the state’s Homeowner Assistance Fund.

The fund is also open to owners of co-ops or condominium units who are behind on maintenance fees, the state said in a statement. Manufactured home owners behind on household loans, installment sales contracts, or lot rents can also apply.

Where can I apply?

Applications can be submitted to nyhomeownerfund.org. They can also be submitted to the state’s Homeowner Assistance Fund call center, 844-77-NYHAF (844-776-9423).

The requester can speak with a live operator in one of several languages, including Spanish, Arabic, and Haitian Creole. Operators can help submit an application.

Learn more about rent relief:NY Provides $ 100 Million to Help Renters Pay Rent and Fight Homelessness Amid Pandemic Hardship

What can the money be used for?

Federal and state regulations are encouraging banks and financial institutions to provide relief to home owners and small business owners during the coronavirus crisis.

Funding can be used to cover a variety of expenses, including:

  • Missed housing payments
  • Reduce mortgage debt to make payments more affordable
  • Property taxes
  • Sewer and water bills

It can also be used by:

  • Unemployed landlords, who can access up to six months of future housing payments
  • Co-op or condominium owners, who can use assistance for late monthly fees such as maintenance fees or homeowner association payments

Call center employees and case managers can also help applicants determine if they qualify for other mortgage relief.

Do I have to refund the money?

The financial assistance will be structured as a five-year, interest-free, non-amortizing repayable grant, according to the State Homeowners Association Fund website.

The grant will be fully forfeited if the owner does not sell, transfer or refinance within five years of receiving the grant, the state website said. The owner will also have to continue to live in the house during this period.

What is the deadline?

The application period will be open for 30 days. However, if the program is not “fully committed” by the end of this initial window, the application period will be extended by at least one month.

Learn more about the program at www.nyhomeownerfund.org.

Tiffany Cusaac-Smith covers race and justice for the USA TODAY Network in New York. Click on here for his latest stories. Follow her on twitter @T_Cusaac.


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Philadelphia Eviction Diversion Program Extended to 2022 | Local news https://nowwashyourhands.com/philadelphia-eviction-diversion-program-extended-to-2022-local-news/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://nowwashyourhands.com/philadelphia-eviction-diversion-program-extended-to-2022-local-news/ [ad_1] The Philadelphia Eviction Prevention Project (PEPP) was created in 2017 in collaboration with City Council and Mayor Jim Kenney to help tenants facing eviction through legal services, mediation services and training. SeniorLAW Center is one of the programs partnered with PEPP to provide legal services to people aged 60 and over who are facing […]]]>


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The Philadelphia Eviction Prevention Project (PEPP) was created in 2017 in collaboration with City Council and Mayor Jim Kenney to help tenants facing eviction through legal services, mediation services and training.

SeniorLAW Center is one of the programs partnered with PEPP to provide legal services to people aged 60 and over who are facing tenant legal issues.

Jacob Speidel is the Director of Tenant Rights at the SeniorLAW Center.

Speidel says many seniors have struggled to pay their rent for a variety of reasons throughout the pandemic.

“People sometimes think older people have a fixed income and are immune to financial crises,” said Speidel. “Many older people are not yet receiving benefits because they are not old enough or because they work in addition to receiving retirement benefits, or because they depend on financial assistance from family members who working. “

Announced in August 2020, the eviction and diversion program allows an agreement between landlords and tenants without involving the courts. The program was established to help tenants in financial difficulty during the pandemic.

Speidel said the eviction diversion program has enabled seniors who lost income during COVID to get proper legal advice on rental assistance options that help them avoid being sent home. .

Although the Eviction Diversion Program does not guarantee funds for rental assistance, Philadelphia has implemented a rental assistance program during the pandemic which has seen thousands of applications, not all of which were processed. With the help of the diversion program, mediations help landlords and tenants resolve the issue before it reaches the point of filing an eviction claim.

The diversion program was due to end at the end of December; However, the city council voted unanimously to extend the program until 2022 during last week’s session.

“The Philadelphia Eviction Diversion Program was created in an emergency and crisis,” said Helen Gym, at-Large Board member. “It happened before we had hundreds of millions of dollars in rent assistance. It happened before we knew how long the COVID crisis would last. But I think what this body of the board has finally figured out is that COVID has exposed the existing ruptures and crises within a system. It didn’t just create them.

Gym said that in Philadelphia, poverty is rampant throughout the city and is a lived experience that accompanies eviction. Before the pandemic, Philly had the fourth highest eviction rate in the country, processing around 22,000 a year.

“For two years in a row, Philadelphia, America’s poorest major city, has reduced the number of evictions by 75% compared to 22,000 evictions in 2019,” Gym said. “We did 4,500 less than in 2020, we will be around 6,000 or a little more than in 2021. So there are alternatives to what has often been one of the worst days in some people’s lives. , which is to have all that one has. discarded without prior notification.

According to Gym, more than $ 230 million in funding has been distributed in the form of rent assistance to 40,000 households.

Before the pandemic, there was a 90-day waiting list for filing an eviction application in city court, and it is currently 30 days. Gym said she wanted people to know there are options, and the diversion program’s success rate is 93%.

“I hope this program will continue to evolve and grow and that our account to city council and our city will continue to evolve and grow in our responses to a situation that is complicated, but devastating for thousands of Philadelphians. Gym said mentioned.

The expansion of the diversion program prevents many people from being excluded from their homes, Speidel said.

“Without this extension, many tenants would have had evictions against them in court and would not have had a defense against the eviction because they owe them money,” Speidel said. “It saves more time and more help in trying to get the landlord to pay the money before people end up in court and end up locked up.”

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2 years after rent strike began, Fruitvale tenants say they have deal to buy their building https://nowwashyourhands.com/2-years-after-rent-strike-began-fruitvale-tenants-say-they-have-deal-to-buy-their-building/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 02:25:17 +0000 https://nowwashyourhands.com/2-years-after-rent-strike-began-fruitvale-tenants-say-they-have-deal-to-buy-their-building/ [ad_1] It was meant to be a protest, but it turned into an attempted celebration. Two years after the start of their rent strike, tenants in a 14-unit apartment building in Fruitvale had planned to march Thursday night to their owners’ home in Alameda, urging them, as they have been doing since 2019, to sell […]]]>


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It was meant to be a protest, but it turned into an attempted celebration.

Two years after the start of their rent strike, tenants in a 14-unit apartment building in Fruitvale had planned to march Thursday night to their owners’ home in Alameda, urging them, as they have been doing since 2019, to sell the building to a community land trust.

They dressed in white, held candles, and rented a live miniature horse, planning to perform a Mexican Christmas tradition called Las Posadas, a re-creation of Joseph and Mary’s search for a shelter in which to give birth to Jesus.

But the Christmas-themed protest suddenly seemed unnecessary. Instead, the tenants learned that they could receive a Christmas present in advance.

Earlier today, the Oakland Community Land Trust and ACCE, a housing advocacy group, finally made contact with the Wong family, the owners of 1534 29th Ave. The Wongs – Calvin and Melinda and their son Wilson – have indicated they may be ready to sell.

The candlelight demonstration drew 40 to 50 supporters. Credit: Amir Aziz

The ACCE had also heard this two years ago and went so far as proclaim victory at the time. But in the months that followed, the multiple land trust offers on the house were either ignored or rejected, according to the organization.

“It’s been very stressful because we don’t know what’s going to happen in the future,” said Jesus Alvarez, who has lived in the building with his family since 2004. Speaking in Spanish via ‘an interpreter, Alvarez said he was facing livability issues. all the time in the unit, including leaky sinks and rotten wood.

The group of protesters – around 50 tenants, organizers and supporters – had gathered in Alameda even after hearing that a deal could finally be reached. They seemed unsure of what to do now that things were improving and a protest could end up thwarting an eventual deal. Back in Oakland, the lawyers helping tenants were working hard on proposals.

Bundled up to brave the frosty evening, the group of tenants finally strolled slowly through the neighborhood of Wongs’ Bay Farm Island, singing a traditional song once out of reach of quiet residences and biding their time hoping for good news. . . There was anxious energy in the air, as ACCE organizers repeatedly checked their phones.

“If you believe in anything, let’s all hope this deal comes through tonight,” organizer Gabriela Vivas told the group.

ACCE organizer Gabriela Vivas answers a call during the march, hoping for news of a deal. Credit: Amir Aziz

At the end of the walk, Oakland City Council member Carroll Fife joined the group. Fife was the Oakland director of ACCE for a long time, but recently stepped down from that role. Dressed in a white costume for the posada, she said she had been negotiating with the owners all day.

“We’ve never been this close,” she told The Oaklandside. “I was there when it all started and I feel obligated to go through with it. I told the tenants that we would win together.

By the end of the night, there was a vague word that the owners had sent the proposal “to their investors,” but everyone went home not quite ready to call it a win.

ACCE attorney Jackie Zaneri told The Oaklandside on Friday evening that a deal had finally been reached. When asked if she was convinced that this deal would lead to a sale, she replied “yes”, the owner had signed a letter of intent to sell the property. From now on, real estate agents will have to work on the purchase contract.

Wilson Wong, reached by email earlier in the afternoon, declined to confirm or comment on the deal.

Tenants went on strike in 2019

Some tenants complained about rent increases and livability issues in the 14-unit building. Credit: Amir Aziz

Many tenants on 29th Avenue have been on rent strike since October 2019, several months before the pandemic prompted many other tenant groups to suspend payments. They began to strike against the reported rent increases and what they described as poor living conditions in the building.

City code enforcement records show nine complaints filed by tenants of the 29th Avenue building over the past few years, some describing livability issues like broken radiators and stoves, an electric pipe. leaky sink, mold and peeling paint.

“Things weren’t getting done, but the rent was going up,” Alvarez said.

According to county records, Calvin and Melinda Wong own at least four other properties in Alameda County in addition to their home and the 29th Avenue building. These properties include apartment buildings in Adam’s Point and Eastlake.

From the start, the striking tenants asked the Wongs to sell the property to the Oakland Community Land Trust. Land trusts ensure that property remains affordable over the long term, often by retaining ownership of the land and selling the building to residents, who do not have the right to resell it for a profit.

ACCE spokesperson Anya Svanoe said since tenants went on strike, the land trust has made three offers which have been rejected. The initial offer was reportedly for $ 3.2 million. Earlier this week, Steve King, executive director of the Oakland Community Land Trust, declined to provide details of the negotiations while they were still underway.

On Thursday, ACCE officials said the most recent offer was $ 3.3 million, in return for a pledge from tenants to pay the rent they withheld before the pandemic and request a COVID-19 rent assistance for missed payments during the crisis.

Advocates lobbied for policies to make it easier for tenants to buy their homes

Many tenant advocates in Oakland want the city to pass legislation ensuring tenants have the first chance to bid on their building when the landlord decides to sell it. Versions of the Tenant Possibility to Buy Act, or TOPA, have been taken into account in Berkeley and a few other US cities as well, and a similar policy exists in Washington, DC Some of the proposals would also allow land trusts or nonprofits to make an early offer, and some would give tenants the right to make another offer an once the seller chooses a private buyer who is not a current tenant. The owners would not be required to accept the offers.

TOPA has faced stiff opposition from local homeowner groups, who say the policy would threaten their ability to sell their properties in a timely manner or could complicate their plans to donate a building or house to a loved one ( most of the proposals provide for exemptions for certain family members).

Sully, a miniature horse hired from Boulder Creek, pretended to be the donkey during the posada.

Even when land trusts make deals to buy properties, costs often get in the way. ACCE and the Oakland Community Land Trust both successfully advocated in 2019 for the inclusion of $ 12 million in the city budget to help land trusts and co-ops acquire small apartment buildings and to transform them into permanent affordable housing. ACCE officials said last year that they planned to submit the 29th Avenue project for funding, but that there was a limit to the number of applications each organization could file.

Earlier this year, the Oakland Community Land Trust received $ 4 million of the city for three other projects, with KK Measure funding.

Fife and ACCE were also active in the Moms 4 Housing movement, where a group of homeless mothers occupied a vacant investor-owned home in West Oakland. The sheriff forcibly evicted the mothers, who were supported by hundreds of protesters, but the owners ultimately agreed to sell the building to the Oakland Community Land Trust as well.

If the deal for the 29th Avenue building goes through, organizers say it will create long-term, stable housing for the families who live there.

“Everyone is happy,” said ACCE lawyer Zaneri. “It wasn’t a legal victory, it really is an organizational victory.”

Alvarez, the tenant at 29th Avenue, said he and other residents were pushing for the sale so that “we will have peace of mind and that will make sure we are safe.”

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Energy prices skyrocket https://nowwashyourhands.com/energy-prices-skyrocket/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 12:08:14 +0000 https://nowwashyourhands.com/energy-prices-skyrocket/ [ad_1] This fall, after harvesting was done, a long-time customer from Iowa called me up and told me he was working on his budget for next year. “My break-even point for corn jumped to $ 5.00 a bushel,” he said. “Is it higher than most of your customers? ” Every day I study and calculate […]]]>


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This fall, after harvesting was done, a long-time customer from Iowa called me up and told me he was working on his budget for next year.

“My break-even point for corn jumped to $ 5.00 a bushel,” he said. “Is it higher than most of your customers? ”

Every day I study and calculate the price of grain and energy. After the April 2020 lows of COVID-19, I saw the grain markets – and the price of crude oil, gasoline, natural gas and ethanol – rise sharply. I was amazed at how positive the margins on ethanol have remained as corn has gone from $ 3.50 a bushel to over $ 7.00 a bushel. For many days and weeks, ethanol prices rose faster than the corn market.

However, I have become increasingly concerned that the sharp rise in crude oil and natural gas prices will increase fuel and fertilizer costs in 2022.

When I looked at the large rebate of December 2022 corn from December 2021 corn, and the rebate of new crop wheat futures, I saw that grain margins would be tight in 2022.





29044_crude oil

In the monthly continuation chart of nearby crude oil futures (black) and corn futures (red), you can see the close correlation between crude oil and corn prices. When rallying higher in 2008, crude oil rallied earlier and further than the corn market. In 2012 and 2020-2021, corn futures prices rose further and faster than the crude oil market. We recommended to buy 2022 fuel and fertilizer in August 2021 and at the same time covered 20% of the corn of the new crop. Fertilizer prices were at very high historical price levels, but the corn / fertilizer ratio was working.

When I make recommendations on marketing the new crop grain, I don’t try to get the upper hand.

Instead, I view new crop coverage as a spreadsheet decision. Can we lock in the inputs and cover the crop in advance to get a profit? Both actions must be taken at the same time.

When I made input recommendations to lock in fuel and fertilizer (as I did in early August for the 2022 crop), I also made hedge recommendations for up to 20% of the crop. 2022 – corn, soybeans and wheat.

I didn’t expect the global fertilizer price to come down, and the weekly crude oil chart seemed to be heading over $ 80 a barrel.

How to manage your marketing in this new more expensive environment? Here are three suggestions:

1. Work closely with your suppliers.

The agricultural retailers that sell fuel, fertilizer, and your other inputs all operate at tight margins in a very competitive market. Try to take a long-term team approach. If you can work with your retailers to buy the right product at the right time and get it to the right place, you greatly increase your chances of making the right decisions.

2. Meet with property owners to show them your margins.

Show them that the 2022 new crop corn, soybeans and wheat are trading at a much lower price than where grain markets rallied last summer. Chances are you’ll pay more rent next year. Try to set up a flexible lease that pays a set amount per acre plus, if your total income exceeds a certain amount, a percentage of that income goes to the landowner.

Again, think of this as a team effort. Try to create a win-win deal.

3. When making pricing decisions for new crops, use all available marketing alternatives.

Last year, farmers who used a combination of hedges and put options fared better than farmers who only used spot contracts or hedges. The puts became worthless, but the loss on the put was minimal compared to the increased value of your new crop corn and soybeans.

What is the game plan for the balance of your 2021 crop and the coverage of part of the 2022 crop?

I am a seasonal seller with additional cash sales expected between May and July 2022. I would consider sales in February and March if a weather alert develops in South America and prices rise to 5% to 10% of highs from 2021.

Remember, March is a critical month of trend change. If prices go up in March, this is usually a good time to sell. If corn and soybean prices correct until March, this is a good time to buy.

Right now, the weather forecast for South America suggests a trend line or a better harvest. There is a good chance that I will have cash sales and new harvests between May and July.





29044_gaznaturel

The monthly continuation chart for nearby natural gas futures (in black) and CBOT wheat (in red) shows a strong (but not perfect) correlation over the past 16 years. The natural gas and wheat markets peaked in 2008 and fell in early 2012. Both hit significant COVID-19 lows in April 2020. From there, wheat prices rose further and further. faster than the natural gas market. In August, we recommended purchasing your 2022 fuel and fertilizer. Fertilizer prices were high, but the number of bushels of new crop wheat it took to pay for fuel and fertilizer was at a historic good ratio.

Here are four key weeks that I’ll be looking at next year:

  • Week ending May 13

  • Week ending May 27

  • Week ending June 24

  • Week ending July 8

These are important weeks of trend change. If the corn and soybean markets recover during these weeks and the news is bullish, stay disciplined and do a series of spot sales. For the 2022 new crop sales, these are key weeks where I will be doing a series of 10% hedges. I will also be buying put options.

Note: The risk of loss in futures and / or options trading is substantial, and every investor and / or trader should consider whether this is a suitable investment. Past performance, whether actual or indicated by simulated historical testing of strategies, is no guarantee of future results. Trading advice reflects good faith judgment at a specific time and is subject to change without notice. There is no guarantee that the advice given will result in profitable transactions.

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Paid in full for the land of the house in 2016, but still pending the ownership document https://nowwashyourhands.com/paid-in-full-for-the-land-of-the-house-in-2016-but-still-pending-the-ownership-document/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 06:10:28 +0000 https://nowwashyourhands.com/paid-in-full-for-the-land-of-the-house-in-2016-but-still-pending-the-ownership-document/ [ad_1] Mr. Editor, I must express my disappointment vis-à-vis the Ministry of Housing, their pace of work and their incompetence. I was allocated land under the Zeeburg / DeWillem housing program in 2015. I paid for it in full in 2016. After a lot of research and shopping, I received the sales contract in 2019. […]]]>


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Mr. Editor,

I must express my disappointment vis-à-vis the Ministry of Housing, their pace of work and their incompetence. I was allocated land under the Zeeburg / DeWillem housing program in 2015. I paid for it in full in 2016. After a lot of research and shopping, I received the sales contract in 2019. J am planning to move into my own home as soon as possible I went to the New Building Society (NBS) to apply for a home loan that year. I was excited when I was told the mortgage would be approved within a month. However, approval required the issuance of a letter of assurance from the Central Housing and Planning Authority (CH&PA). A letter was sent by NBS to CHPA on August 13, 2019 requesting the letter of assurance. I have a copy. A letter of assurance to the bank states that whenever the ownership document is available, it will be returned to the bank.

During the period 2019-2021, I made at least 6 visits to the housing office in Georgetown. In addition to that, I made numerous phone calls. Finally, on February 17, 2021, I met Minister Susan Rodrigues. She told me that the problem would be solved in a few months. I visited the CH&PA again on March 17, 2021 but no progress has been linked to me on the matter. I called CH&PA back on November 23, 2021 but again, no positive response was given regarding the issue. It is almost the end of the year and it is discouraging that after 5 years of full payment of a real estate lot by the government (PPP / C and APNU / AFC) one cannot have any assurance that he / she will never be in possession of the ticket or the transport. This is an extremely desperate situation for the beneficiaries of the housing units of the Zeeburg / DeWillem Housing Scheme. If CH&PA cannot assure the banks of the availability of title or transport at any time in the future, then it is reasonable to assume that beneficiaries may die without ever acquiring ownership of the land for which they toil and sweat.

After paying in full, we were given documents that were and are completely unnecessary for the banks. Whenever I contact senior officials of CH&PA, I am told that nothing is being done for Zeeburg / DeWillem Scheme. Every time I hear that, it’s like a hit in the guts. Each time, I feel the agonizing pain of having to pay rent for a year and a year more. It is heartbreaking and appalling that the government treats its young professionals in this way and expects to curb the brain drain. I suggest that if the government cannot issue property documents to beneficiaries in a timely manner, then it should expand contract house construction to those who wish under the Zeeburg / DeWillem housing program. Another suggestion is that the CH&PA provide the construction materials as listed in the construction specifications of the beneficiaries. The government can also vouch for beneficiaries at the bank so that their loans can be approved and they can start building their homes so that their “dreams can come true”.

Finally, I suggest that the CH&PA simply issue the letter of assurance to the banks until they have resolved the internal issues to grant the land titles. With the rising cost of building materials, the high cost of rent and living in Guyana, it is impossible to save and build. It should be noted that the current President, Irfaan Ali, was the Minister of Housing at the time of the allocation of the lots; Given that he now holds the highest office in the country, I plead that he is using his power to right this injustice inflicted on recipients of the Zeeburg / DeWillem housing program. We have been neglected for too long. If they can’t fix this in the next few months, then in my analysis they’re just as incompetent as previous governments, and Guyana would have been a better country under British rule.

Truly,

B. Persaud

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A moving day in an SC deportation court during COVID https://nowwashyourhands.com/a-moving-day-in-an-sc-deportation-court-during-covid/ https://nowwashyourhands.com/a-moving-day-in-an-sc-deportation-court-during-covid/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://nowwashyourhands.com/a-moving-day-in-an-sc-deportation-court-during-covid/ [ad_1] Lisa Belton has her arm in a sling as she packs up her house on Thursday, October 28, 2021. Joshua Boucher jboucher@thestate.com Sporting a set of blue scrubs, Tonez Wilson was fidgeting in his seat waiting for his name to be called out. The 23-year-old was due to finish his nursing program within a […]]]>


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Lisa Belton has her arm in a sling as she packs up her house on Thursday, October 28, 2021.

Lisa Belton has her arm in a sling as she packs up her house on Thursday, October 28, 2021.

jboucher@thestate.com

Sporting a set of blue scrubs, Tonez Wilson was fidgeting in his seat waiting for his name to be called out. The 23-year-old was due to finish his nursing program within a week and should have been in class that morning. Instead, he was at Richland County Central Court in Dentsville, fighting not to be evicted from his apartment.

Over the past two months, he had accumulated $ 1,417.80 in past due rents. Now, after four years of renting with the same company, the owner wanted him to leave.

Wilson is one of ten tenants who passed through trial judge Phillip F. Newsom’s courtroom on Wednesday, October 27, and one of countless others nationwide who are at risk of losing their homes.

Tenants who struggled at the start of the pandemic have been temporarily protected from eviction by a federal moratorium. These protections expired in August, but many are still struggling to get back on their feet.

Even before COVID-19, South Carolina had the highest deportation rate of any state in the country, according to a study by the Deportation Lab at Princeton University.

Sue Berkowitz, executive director of the SC Appleseed Justice Center, said that despite the far-reaching consequences of evictions, it was one of the state’s most overlooked issues.

“A lack of stable affordable housing in South Carolina, along with laws that facilitate evictions, has led to a crisis. And there’s no reason to think things won’t be so bad or worse with this pandemic. ”

Under South Carolina Law, landlords can evict a tenant if they don’t pay rent within five days of the due date or if they violate the terms of their lease. This includes staying beyond the lease end date.

The owners many of whom spent months waiting to collect rent because of the moratorium say that filing a deportation application is often the only tool they have to help recoup their losses.

The state spent a day in Magistrates’ Court observing eviction hearings and questioning tenants to put a face to the issue lawyers have long warned against.

Some of those threatened with eviction had not paid their rent because they had lost their jobs, had their wages cut or were facing a medical emergency. Others simply misunderstood the terms of their lease.

Eight of the tenants were people of color. One was not fluent in English and needed a translator. None of them had a lawyer. They all hoped to stay home, or at least buy some time before they had to leave.

The information in this story comes both from testimony in court and from interviews with the state.

Twelve days to make two months’ rent

The reason Wilson started nursing school was to earn more money. But eventually balancing school and work became untenable, and he was fired from his carrier job at Prisma Health due to scheduling conflicts.

Although he works part-time in a retirement home on weekends, this job does not pay enough to cover his rent, so he failed in August and September. He asked for help under the Richland County Emergency Rental Assistance Program, but was still awaiting a response when he found an eviction notice stuck on his door a few weeks ago .

“I guess I was expecting it a bit, but I wasn’t expecting it so soon,” he said.

When asked by Justice Newsom how he planned to find the $ 1,480.70, Wilson assured him that he had been accepted into the program, that his rent assistance check was on the way and that he had a promising employment after graduation.

“We try to help our tenants when we can,” said owner Will Fowler.

The judge gave Wilson twelve days to repay the debt.

Wilson was grateful for the second chance, but knew there was no guarantee that the rent assistance would arrive on time. Without this check, he would have no choice but to move.

But Wilson was trying not to focus on it. Instead, her mind was on her graduation. If all goes according to plan, he will graduate as a practical nurse from ECPI University. From there, he hopes to earn an associate’s degree and become a registered nurse.

“At this point all I can do is wait,” he said.

Bad timing

“You can lift your left hand since you clearly cannot lift your right. Judge Newsom told Lisa Belton.

When she appeared before him on Wednesday, she was recovering from a recent operation and had her right arm in a sling. The over $ 3,000 she paid in medical bills caused her to delay rent in September.

Belton and his owner, Cornie J. Davis, had a strained relationship. She told the judge that he had skimped on the necessary repairs. He claimed that she never got the rent on time.

Still, whenever she’s been late in the past, she said he was usually lenient as long as she paid a penalty. This time it was different.

“I’m sick of this,” Davis told the judge. “I try to be nice but every time I’m nice people step on me.”

Belton and her husband had been looking for a new place to live for a year, but they arrived empty-handed. Now they should scramble at the last minute to find something.

“It sounds like bad luck, bad timing,” she said. As she watched her friends and family struggle to get through 2020, she was able to keep her job and put up with it. “Now, after all of this, things are falling apart just as we were getting ready to leave.”

The judge gave her until November 3 to move out. Now she said she has to figure out how to tidy up her whole house with one arm.

No more moratorium

Eight months. It’s been how long Lisa Holmes hasn’t paid her rent in full.

The problem started in February when she moved from a sales position at her company to another job. The money she earned from commissions usually helped her overcome the bump each month.

Running out of money, she tried to find ways to cut spending, but found that no matter how many pennies she made, she wasn’t going to earn rent.

Then she stumbled upon what she believed to be her saving grace: the Center for Disease Control’s moratorium on evictions.

“I just signed this form and submitted it to my landlord and he ended all evictions.” she said.

She hoped the moratorium would give her time to resume her old sales job. But over the months nothing changed at work and the bills kept piling up. In April, she was fired for taking too many sick days.

Then, in August, the moment she dreaded finally arrived. The United States Supreme Court has permanently overturned the moratorium on evictions. Within months, she received the eviction notice she thought she could avoid. At this point, she owed more than $ 8,300.

The judge explained that she had until November 3 to pay off her debt and until November 5 to pay $ 1,200 for that month’s rent.

Although she applied for the Richland County Emergency Rental Assistance Program in August, she is still waiting to be approved.

Holmes said she knew she wouldn’t have the money on time, but she hopes that if she can at least show her landlord a letter of approval from the rent assistance program, he will agree to work. with her.

“COVID was stressful enough like that already, but it only added a whole other layer,” she said

Forced with nowhere to go

When Heather Griffith received the notice that her lease would not be renewed and that she had until the end of the month to leave, she couldn’t believe it.

She and her 14 year old son had lived in the same mobile home park for 9 years. At $ 400 a month, it was the only two bedroom she could afford.

Although she has already been threatened with eviction several times for lack of rent, “we have always managed to find a solution,” she said. “We’ve never even been to court before. ”

She was sure it would be the same this time. But as the audience got closer, reality started to sink.

When she finally appeared before the judge, Griffith didn’t know what to expect.

“Can you tell me why you haven’t moved when your lease is up?” ” He asked.

Griffith told her she had nowhere to go and thought she could challenge the decision in court. Her voice began to fade as she fought back tears.

“Unfortunately, the law does not allow you to do this. Judge Newsom said, noting that her owner could in fact sue her for damages. “I have to issue the writ, I have no choice.”

He gave her until November 3 to move out.

Heather wasn’t sentimental about leaving the mobile home park. She had dreamed of getting out of there for years. But with poor credit and an eviction on her record, she knew finding new housing in a week would be next to impossible.

“I just feel like a failure,” she said.

Editor’s Note: The state has contacted Richland County to inquire about Wilson and Holmes’ requests for rent assistance. A spokesperson said the county couldn’t discuss individual cases, but it typically takes four to six weeks for an application to be approved, and an additional 21 business days for payment to be made. The county said other factors can cause approval or payment delays.

Rebecca Liebson covers housing and livability for the state. She is also a member of the Report for America Corps. Rebecca joined The State in 2020. She graduated from Stony Brook University in 2019 and has written for the New York Times, New York Post and NBC. His work has been recognized by the Society of Professional Journalists, the Hearst Foundation and the Press Club of Long Island.
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